Citriodora Hook ( Lemon Eucalyptus) Essential Oil

Citriodora Hook ( Lemon Eucalyptus) Essential Oil

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  • Botanical Name: Eucalyptus citriodora Hook. [synonym of Corymbia citriodora (Hook.) K.D.Hill & L.A.S.Johnson]
  • Origin: South Africa, Madagascar or Malawi (see COA for lot specific origin)
  • Process: Steam Distilled Essential Oil
  • Plant Part: Leaves
  • Cultivation: Conventional, Unsprayed
  • Use: Aromatherapy / Natural Perfumery. Always dilute.
  • Note: Top Note
  • Aroma Families: Herbal, Lemon-like
  • Aroma: Very fresh, cool, lemony, with rosy, citronella-like notes and a sweet balsamic, slightly floral drydown; has a softer, less medicinal aroma than our other Eucalyptus oils.
  • Contraindications: Possible skin/mucous membrane irritant; please see Safety Considerations below.

 

Lemon Eucalyptus Essential Oil - Unsprayed

Our fresh Lemon Eucalyptus essential oil from South Africa has an enlivening yet relaxing aroma that is very fresh, cool, lemony, with rosy, citronella-like notes and a sweet balsamic, slightly floral drydown; it has a softer, less medicinal aroma than our other Eucalyptus oils. Eucalyptus citriodora (now known as Corymbia citriodora) is part of a group of oils (including Litsea Cubeba, Melissa, Verbena and Citronella) that feature the soft, lemony aldehydes – distinctly different molecules from limonene, the tart, citrus-sourced terpene. Lemon Eucalyptus oil adds these lively, lemony (non-citrus) top notes to natural perfume formulations.

For hundreds of years, the Aborigines of Australia have used the leaves of Eucalyptus for their antiseptic and healing actions.1 In the mid-1800s, groves of Eucalyptus trees were planted in one of the most swampy and unhealthy districts of Algiers, North Africa – a brilliant botanical strategy – to halt the spread of malaria. The trees required large amounts of water to thrive, thus lowering the water table and eliminating breeding habitat for malaria-carrying mosquitoes as well as repelling these insects with the aroma exhaled from the leaves.2,3 

We now know that in addition to a wide range of aromatherapeutic benefits, Lemon Eucalyptus is especially useful to discourage insects due to a tiny percentage of p-menthane-3,8-diol (aka PMD), a molecule that can be synthesized from citronellal.4 In 2000 the EPA registered PMD as a ‘biopesticide repellant’, i.e., derived from natural materials. An alternative to toxic chemical repellants, PMD acts by masking or confusing the environmental cues that mosquitoes use to locate their target.5 Aldehydes have another important attribute: that of addressing physical discomfort after sports or physical over-exertion. This application is well-known to massage therapists, so it is no wonder that moderately-priced Lemon Eucalyptus is used with such frequency.

For information regarding the aromatherapeutic attributes of Lemon Eucalyptus essential oil, please see:

  • L’Aromathérapie Exactement, Pierre Franchomme and Dr. Daniel Pénoël, 1990, p. 351.
  • Essential Oils – A Handbook for Aromatherapy Practice, Jennifer Peace Rhind, 2012, pp. 187-8.
  • Aromatherapeutic Blending: Essential Oils in Synergy, Jennifer Peace Rhind, 2016, p. 263.
  • Aromatherapy for Health Professionals, 2nd ed., Shirley and Len Price, 1999, p. 324.
  • Aromatherapy Workbook (revised edition), Marcel Lavabre, 1997, p. 135.
  • The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils, Julia Lawless, 2013, pp. 88-9.
  • Medical Aromatherapy – Healing with Essential Oils, Kurt Schnaubelt, 1999, p. 200.
  • "Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Activities: Chemical Constituents of Essential Oils of Ocimum gratissima, Eucalyptus citriodora and Cymbopogon giganteus Inhibited Lipoxygenase L-1 and Cyclooxygenase of PGHS," G Bedi Sahouo, ZF Tonzibo, et al., Bull Chem Soc Ethiop, 2003, 17(2): 191-197, https://www.ajol.info/index.php/bcse/article/viewFile/61681/49785
  • "Plant-based insect repellents: a review of their efficacy, development and testing," MF Maia and SJ Moore, Malar J, 2011; 10(Suppl 1): S11, DOI: 10.1186/1475-2875-10-S1-S11, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3059459/
  • "Airborne Antituberculosis Activity of Eucalyptus citriodora Essential Oil," RF Ramos Alvarenga, B Wan, et al., J Nat Prod, 2014, 77: 603-610, http://www.academia.edu/15826767/Airborne_Antituberculosis_
    Activity_of_Eucalyptus_citriodora_Essential_Oil
  • Lemon Eucalyptus Essential Oil

    Lemon Eucalyptus Essential Oil - Unsprayed

    Our fresh Lemon Eucalyptus essential oil from South Africa has an enlivening yet relaxing aroma that is very fresh, cool, lemony, with rosy, citronella-like notes and a sweet balsamic, slightly floral drydown; it has a softer, less medicinal aroma than our other Eucalyptus oils. Eucalyptus citriodora (now known as Corymbia citriodora) is part of a group of oils (including Litsea Cubeba, Melissa, Verbena and Citronella) that feature the soft, lemony aldehydes – distinctly different molecules from limonene, the tart, citrus-sourced terpene. Lemon Eucalyptus oil adds these lively, lemony (non-citrus) top notes to natural perfume formulations.

    For hundreds of years, the Aborigines of Australia have used the leaves of Eucalyptus for their antiseptic and healing actions.1 In the mid-1800s, groves of Eucalyptus trees were planted in one of the most swampy and unhealthy districts of Algiers, North Africa – a brilliant botanical strategy – to halt the spread of malaria. The trees required large amounts of water to thrive, thus lowering the water table and eliminating breeding habitat for malaria-carrying mosquitoes as well as repelling these insects with the aroma exhaled from the leaves.2,3 

    We now know that in addition to a wide range of aromatherapeutic benefits, Lemon Eucalyptus is especially useful to discourage insects due to a tiny percentage of p-menthane-3,8-diol (aka PMD), a molecule that can be synthesized from citronellal.4 In 2000 the EPA registered PMD as a ‘biopesticide repellant’, i.e., derived from natural materials. An alternative to toxic chemical repellants, PMD acts by masking or confusing the environmental cues that mosquitoes use to locate their target.5 Aldehydes have another important attribute: that of addressing physical discomfort after sports or physical over-exertion. This application is well-known to massage therapists, so it is no wonder that moderately-priced Lemon Eucalyptus is used with such frequency.

    For information regarding the aromatherapeutic attributes of Lemon Eucalyptus essential oil, please see:

    • L’Aromathérapie Exactement, Pierre Franchomme and Dr. Daniel Pénoël, 1990, p. 351.
    • Essential Oils – A Handbook for Aromatherapy Practice, Jennifer Peace Rhind, 2012, pp. 187-8.
    • Aromatherapeutic Blending: Essential Oils in Synergy, Jennifer Peace Rhind, 2016, p. 263.
    • Aromatherapy for Health Professionals, 2nd ed., Shirley and Len Price, 1999, p. 324.
    • Aromatherapy Workbook (revised edition), Marcel Lavabre, 1997, p. 135.
    • The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils, Julia Lawless, 2013, pp. 88-9.
    • Medical Aromatherapy – Healing with Essential Oils, Kurt Schnaubelt, 1999, p. 200.
    • "Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Activities: Chemical Constituents of Essential Oils of Ocimum gratissima, Eucalyptus citriodora and Cymbopogon giganteus Inhibited Lipoxygenase L-1 and Cyclooxygenase of PGHS," G Bedi Sahouo, ZF Tonzibo, et al., Bull Chem Soc Ethiop, 2003, 17(2): 191-197, https://www.ajol.info/index.php/bcse/article/viewFile/61681/49785
    • "Plant-based insect repellents: a review of their efficacy, development and testing," MF Maia and SJ Moore, Malar J, 2011; 10(Suppl 1): S11, DOI: 10.1186/1475-2875-10-S1-S11, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3059459/
    • "Airborne Antituberculosis Activity of Eucalyptus citriodora Essential Oil," RF Ramos Alvarenga, B Wan, et al., J Nat Prod, 2014, 77: 603-610, http://www.academia.edu/15826767/Airborne_Antituberculosis_
      Activity_of_Eucalyptus_citriodora_Essential_Oil